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FAQ on RoHS and WEEE

This FAQ is mainly intended to answer customers' and product end-users' questions about the RoHS and WEEE Regulations, and how products are affected.

Part 1 – RoHS

Q. What is RoHS?

Q. What are the six substances

Q. When did the Regulations come into force?

Q. Are all products affected?

Q. Are all relevant Proception products now RoHS-compliant?

Q. How do you ensure that imported products comply?

Q. Do you have a RoHS compliance statement or certificate?

 

Part 2 – WEEE

Q. What is WEEE?

Q. When did it come into force?

Q. What's the WEEE marking?

Q. How are Proception products affected?

Q. Will you be accepting waste product back?


Part 1 - RoHS

Q. What is RoHS?

A. RoHS (usually pronounced as "rosh" or "roz") stands for the "Restriction of Hazardous Substances" and is a European Union initiative to reduce the level of certain toxic substances entering the waste stream.

The RoHS directive, restricts the use of six specific substances formerly used in electrical and electronic equipment.

The directive is implemented in the UK by means of "The Restriction of the Use of Certain Hazardous Substances in Electrical and Electronic Equipment Regulations 2006" (Statutory Instrument 2006 No. 1463).


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Q. What are the six substances?

A. The following table shows the restricted substances and their maximum allowed concentrations in each homogenous part of a product.

Restricted substance Max. concentration (by weight)

Lead

0.1%

Hexavalent chromium

0.1%

Mercury

0.1%

Polybrominated biphenyls

0.1%

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers

0.1%

Cadmium

0.01%


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Q. When did the Regulations come into force?

A. The UK RoHS Regulations took effect from 1st July 2006.


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Q. Are all products affected?

A. No. Products which are used only as component parts of a fixed installation in a building and which have no direct function away from the installation are not required to comply with the RoHS regulations. Other equipment such as amplifiers which can be used independently of a fixed installation falls into Category 4 of the regulations – consumer equipment – and is thus covered by the legislation.


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Q. Are all relevant  products now RoHS-compliant?

A. Yes. In fact all product imported since March 2006, including the fixed installation items, is certified fully compliant.


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Q. How do you ensure that imported products comply?

A. Blake and Proception have built long-term close working relationships with Far-Eastern suppliers. Our principal supplier takes RoHS compliance very seriously and has an active materials testing programme using their own X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer facilities. The manufacturer's facilities in Taiwan and China operate under quality and environmental management systems independently certified to ISO 9001:2000 and ISO 14001:2004 by SGS United Kingdom Ltd. Component and materials selection and procurement procedures ensure that only RoHS compliant materials are used. Where necessary manufacturing processes have been modified during 2005-06 for RoHS compliant production (e.g. lead-free soldering processes).

In addition we have established contact with an XRF test facility in the UK and has undertaken finished product testing.

Each shipment of Far-Eastern manufactured product is accompanied by a certificate of conformity to the RoHS concentration limits. All product is traceable to week of manufacture and the UK landed date through our 5-digit product batch coding system.


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Q. Do you have a RoHS compliance statement or certificate?

A. Yes - see below.


The Restriction of the Use of Certain Hazardous Substances in Electrical and Electronic Equipment Regulations 2012 - Commonly known as RoHS 2
(UK Statutory Instrument 2012 No. 3032)

This statement certifies that Blake UK Limited and products sold under the brand Blake Aerials, Blake UK and Proception have taken reasonable steps and exercised due diligence to ensure that their relevant new electrical and electronic equipment put on the market on or after 2nd January 2012 complies with Regulation 10 of the above regulations.

Relevant products

Relevant products are those which carry the crossed-out wheelie bin symbol (as required by the WEEE directive). Products which are used only as component parts of a large-scale fixed installation and which have no direct function away from the installation are not required to comply with the RoHS regulations.

CE Marking

Relevant products also carry the CE mark, as required by Regulation 16 of the above regulations.

Origin and manufacturing facilities

The origin of relevant products is China. The principal manufacturing facility operates under quality and environmental management systems independently certified to ISO 9001:2000 and ISO 14001:2004 by SGS United Kingdom Ltd. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) facilities are available at the factory for RoHS compliance testing of incoming materials and finished assemblies.

Traceability

All product is traceable to week of manufacture and UK landed date through our 5-digit product batch coding system. Each shipment of Far-Eastern manufactured product is accompanied by an individual certificate of conformity to the RoHS concentration limits.

Enquiries

Customers' enquiries relating to RoHS compliance of products should be made by e-mail to support@proception.co.uk.


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Part 2 – WEEE

Q. What is WEEE?

A. WEEE stands for "Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment" and is a European Union initiative to reduce the amount of unwanted electrical and electronic equipment being dumped in landfill tips. In particular the WEEE directive makes producers of equipment responsible for the cost of collecting, processing and recycling waste, and sets recycling targets. 


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Q. When did it come into force?

A. WEEE legislation was implemented in 2007.


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Q. What's the WEEE marking?

A. The crossed-out wheelie bin symbol, which has been required since August 2005, is used to indicate equipment which should not be disposed of with general household waste. The horizontal bar underneath the bin indicates items which were first placed on the market after August 2005. Some manufacturers may use a date code instead of this bar.


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Q. How are Proception products affected?

A. Some products are within the scope of the expected WEEE legislation and these already carry the marking. Other products which are used only as component parts of a fixed installation in a building and which have no direct function away from the installation are expected to be outside the scope of the WEEE legislation. Amplifiers which can be used independently of a fixed installation fall into Category 4 – consumer equipment – and are expected to be within the scope of WEEE.


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Q. Will you be accepting waste product back?

A. Not directly. Proception expects to meet its legal WEEE obligations through membership of an approved compliance scheme. Collection facilities for WEEE will be established at local authority waste facilities and may also be offered by some retailers and wholesalers.


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